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Grad Student Post

Call for submissions: 5th Annual IEHS Grad Student Blog Competition Due November 22, 2019

Call for submissions: Do you want to showcase your research and win $100? Enter the Immigration and Ethnic History Graduate Student Blog Competition, due Friday, November 22, 2019. Recognizing the need to bring critical and evidence-based knowledge to public conversations on timely issues,…

Evan Turiano, “Teaching Fiction in Immigration History: Preparation for the Next Life, by Atticus Lish”

An advanced undergraduate seminar on United States immigration history presents an intimidating problem of scale. There is so much relevant content that it may seem impossible to devote time to particular, non-representative immigrant experiences, especially fictional ones. However, including fiction…

Asher Lubotzky, “We Become the Scape-Goat”: African Voices at Indiana University in the 1960s

Since the 1950s, Indiana University (IU) has gone through a remarkable transformation in terms of its foreign student population. In a few decades, IU transformed itself from an ‘All-American’ school’ into an international hub. By 1977, the number of international…

JoAnn LoSavio, “Educated Professionals: Thai Women in Transnational Perspective”

“Human-trafficking,” “exploitation,” and “victim” are three words that have ruined how the world sees Thai women. These words have hidden them, covered them like invisible ink. They posit Thai women as passive and exotic, or worse as defeated, abused casualties…

Stepan Serdiukov, “Remembering the Old Neighborhood in Chicago: Residential Desegregation, White Ethnic Revival, and the Politics of Oral History”

As a graduate student, I became fascinated by spatial history and immigration during the Progressive Era. I wanted to understand how recent immigrants living in large cities in this era described their surroundings, and wondered what these descriptions would reveal…

Bryan Winston, “Contesting Immigration Incarceration: How the Mexican Consulate in St. Louis Worked to Free Migrants”

On December 11, 1911, a court in Johnson County, Iowa found Enrique Betancourt guilty of larceny. A week later, he was incarcerated at the Reformatory in Anamosa, Iowa, sentenced for five years. Betancourt, who only arrived in the United States…

Call for submissions: Do you want to showcase your research and win $100? Enter the Immigration and Ethnic History Graduate Student Blog Competition, due January 15, 2019

Call for submissions: Do you want to showcase your research and win $100? Enter the Immigration and Ethnic History Graduate Student Blog Competition, due January 15. Recognizing the need to bring critical and evidence-based knowledge to public conversations on timely…

Jesse Chariton, “No Whiskey on St. Paddy’s Day: A Transition from Genealogical Curiosity to Historical Inquiry”

A misconception of the discipline of history is that it is “all about names and dates.” But, another misconception is that names and dates are the primary concern of genealogists, or those who hire them. Though neither of those ideas…

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