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Citizenship

In 2017 IEHS scholars made history
In 2017 IEHS scholars made history

In 2017 IEHS scholars made history

In 2017, historians entered the fray. Immigration and ethnic history society scholars, especially, have been called to bring historical thinking and analysis to policy issues and public debates about immigration, citizenship, borders, white supremacy, and vulnerable and marginalized communities. Not…

Katherine S. Carper, “The Difficulty of Studying “Immigrants” in the Early 19th Century”

There is one letter I find myself going back to in the course of my dissertation research. In October 2016, as part of a collection of thank-you notes to then-First Lady Michelle Obama, actor/writer/producer Rashida Jones wrote, “Rarely can someone…

Kevin Kenny, “Insiders and Outsiders in Nineteenth-Century American Immigration History”

When we distinguish between immigrants and native-born Americans today, citizenship provides a firm dividing line. Everyone born within the national territory is a citizen of the United States (with the exception of the children of foreign diplomats). People born abroad…

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