IEHS Online

Blog

Evan Turiano, “Teaching Fiction in Immigration History: Preparation for the Next Life, by Atticus Lish”

An advanced undergraduate seminar on United States immigration history presents an intimidating problem of scale. There is so much relevant content that it may seem impossible to devote time to particular, non-representative immigrant experiences, especially fictional ones. However, including fiction…

Asher Lubotzky, “We Become the Scape-Goat”: African Voices at Indiana University in the 1960s

Since the 1950s, Indiana University (IU) has gone through a remarkable transformation in terms of its foreign student population. In a few decades, IU transformed itself from an ‘All-American’ school’ into an international hub. By 1977, the number of international…

JoAnn LoSavio, “Educated Professionals: Thai Women in Transnational Perspective”

“Human-trafficking,” “exploitation,” and “victim” are three words that have ruined how the world sees Thai women. These words have hidden them, covered them like invisible ink. They posit Thai women as passive and exotic, or worse as defeated, abused casualties…

IEHS 2019 Award winners

Theodore Saloutos Memorial Book Prize: Ana Raquel Minian, Undocumented Lives: The Untold Story of Mexican Migration Honorable Mention: Simeon Man, Soldiering Through Empire: Race and the Making of the Decolonizing Pacific IEHS First Book Award: Rosina Lozano, An American Language: The History of…

IEHS Members Encouraged to Sign-Up for Expert Witness Database at the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies

By Andy Urban and Elliott Young The United States is on track to incarcerate more immigrants this year for longer than ever before.  Women, men, children, infants, and entire families have been caught in the jaws of the immigrant detention…

Stepan Serdiukov, “Remembering the Old Neighborhood in Chicago: Residential Desegregation, White Ethnic Revival, and the Politics of Oral History”

As a graduate student, I became fascinated by spatial history and immigration during the Progressive Era. I wanted to understand how recent immigrants living in large cities in this era described their surroundings, and wondered what these descriptions would reveal…

Facebook
Twitter