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Samuel J. Klee, “Childlike Cultivators? Catholicism and Latinx Migrants in Chesterfield, Missouri, 1951-1965”

What’s a priest to do when his flock is unfree? Fr. John F. Godfrey, a mid-twentieth century priest at Ascension Catholic Church in Chesterfield, Missouri, ministered to farmworkers at the Hellwig Brothers’ Farm. During World War II, the Hellwigs and…

Call for submissions: 5th Annual IEHS Grad Student Blog Competition Due November 22, 2019

Call for submissions: Do you want to showcase your research and win $100? Enter the Immigration and Ethnic History Graduate Student Blog Competition, due Friday, November 22, 2019. Recognizing the need to bring critical and evidence-based knowledge to public conversations on timely issues,…

Carolina Ortega & Bryan Winston, “Mexican Consulates and the Negotiation of Inequality in the 20th Century”

In 1930 the Mexican consul in New York City wrote to the Secretaría General del Estado in Mexico City to inform the Mexican government of the upcoming Mexican Independence Day celebrations that would take place in the city. According to…

Hidetaka Hirota, “No Frontiers but Those of Humanity Itself: Immigration Reform in Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts.”

One of the most important developments in modern America is the widening gap between citizens and noncitizens. Citizenship status in many ways determines the rights and privileges of people in the United States today. But in the nineteenth century the…

Evan Turiano, “Teaching Fiction in Immigration History: Preparation for the Next Life, by Atticus Lish”

An advanced undergraduate seminar on United States immigration history presents an intimidating problem of scale. There is so much relevant content that it may seem impossible to devote time to particular, non-representative immigrant experiences, especially fictional ones. However, including fiction…

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